My Leather Maker Bag is finished


#1

A few months ago I purchased two patterns from SavageIndustries. I finally had the time to make a bag from them. This is now my dedicated Maker Bag.


I purchased the EDC One and EDC Two patterns from @mistersavage via Savage Industries a few months ago. I’m a member of Dallas Maker Space and I lead the Leather Working Special Interest Group there, so naturally I wanted to make a Leather Maker Bag to carry my PPE, tools, and gear I take with me when working on projects there. The first thing I did was transfer the pattern so the originals would be safe and reused.

I used a 6-7oz dark brown utility leather for the bottom. It’s nice and thick and should hold up well to hard use. It’s also stiff enough to hold the square shape even when the bag is empty.

The main part of the bag is made with a softer temper pebbled leather.

The first modification I made was adding a zippered pocket to the outside, on the same side as the inner pocket that holds a notebook and pens.

Sewing these two pockets was tricky. I had to chisel all the holes for each separately, taking care that they would like up when put together. Then sew the inside edges of the inner pocket. Then I sewed the zipper onto the outer pocket and continue the stitch to attach it to the side across the top. When I got to the edges, I started including the inside pocket as well. Confusing? yeah it was tough to figure out. I wanted a single stitch line, for both pockets though.

The inside pocket for notebook and pens. I should have placed the pocket a half inch lower on the bag. It’s not a big deal, but the erasers on the pencils touch the top of the inside of the bag. Not a big deal, but the next one will have these set lower.

I prefer Japanese Seiwa Chisels. 4 holes at a time, saddle stitched, makes for aching fingers.

This is a horrible picture. I’m not sure why I added it.

Base attached, pockets attached, it’s ready to turn into a tube. This is where I made another modification to the pattern. Rather than sew the bag inside out, I overlapped the edges of the leather. You’ll see what I mean in a few photos.

The folded edges on the bottom of the bag, had 6 layers of leather I had to stitch through. I backstitched here just in case, to make it stronger.

I overlapped the edges as seen here. Nice thing about working with leather is I don’t need to worry about a seam allowance.

For the top of the bag I used this aluminum stock I bent. This is great because it keeps the bag open when unzipped and prevents it from collapsing on itself. When Adam puts his bag together, he sews the channel the frame sits in then feeds the frame through it. I wasn’t sure I’d be able to do that so I stitched the frame in place instead. That worked well as there was enough give that I could adjust the frame by sliding it to make it even on both sides.

The zipper pocket on one side of the completed bag.

I added a wrap handle that snaps shut.

The pencils fit fine in the inside pocket, but they do touch the top of the bag when closed.

Respirator, Goggles, and a small bag of tools will live here now.


#2

That’s damn impressive Jorge, great work!


#3

Wow! That is incredible!


#4

That is so awesome!


#5

Beautiful bag!! How long did it take you?


#6

How did you make the “frame” that closes at the top?


#7

I started working on it on September 10 and finished it September 23. So over the course of those two weeks I probably put in 15-20 hours total I think? I’m terrible at keeping track of this stuff.

That includes a lot of planning time trying to figure out things like how I wanted the pockets to line up, and most of the rest of the time is hand stitching. The next one will probably land around the 10 hour mark, now that I’ve made this one.

I used an 1/2" wide , 1/8" thick aluminum bar stock from Home Depot. I cut it to size with my Dremel, then bent the edges on my table vice. In the photo above the part after the bend is actually longer than the final version I used in the bag. I had to cut another inch off so it would zip and unzip smoother. With a doctor’s bag style frame, the two pieces are connected and hinge, in this version they are not and are there just for stability when the bag is open.


#8

This is fantastic. And also love all the process info and pics. Nice photography too


#9

I need to take some of your leather classes!


#10

You should. He’s an excellent teacher


#11

Zippers intimidate me. Hand-stitching one doubly so. This gives me hope that someday I might tackle something like this!


#12

Agreed. Keeping zippers centered is a pain in the ass. Keeping them even on both sides is a pain in the ass. Hand stitching is a pain in the ass. Combine all that and you have a super pain in the ass. Which is why a bag like this cost 3 million quid.


#13

My wife just made a small purse. She used sticky labels printed with stitch patterns to get the stitch holes in exactly the right places. Worked well.

The laser cutters are also handy for marking stitch holes.


#14

If it were fabric I’d suggest Wonder Tape for placing the zipper, etc. but washaway properties doesn’t really help on this one. It did turn out fabulous though!


#15

I did use some very narrow double sided tape to hold it in place. Ideally, one would glue it on for a permanent hold, but I’m impatient…


#16

And also, Adam Savage comimented my build. Gonna just ride that happy for a few days!!!


#17

Selling price, 1 MILLION DOLLARS!


#18

Yeah I was wondering if the laser cutter could “drill” the stitch holes cleanly.


#19

You seriously need to plug this with pics. on Twitter addrssed to @donttrythis

He’d be amazed.


#20

Here’s some pics of lazered leather work (done right here in DMS)