Oven Floor loading

#1

Just curious what the floor loading is on the oven. I’m assuming that since we can step inside or it that it can handle at least 300 lbs. Reason I’m asking is that I’m considering repairing an anvil which would require a pre-heat to 400 degrees, and making sure that there is not a problem with putting that much weight on the floor. Most everything demo’d was a way to hang.

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#2

I can’t speak to the floor’s rated load, but if you do an anvil you may want to put it on something that will distribute it’s weight better so it’s not a point load.

I dunno, maybe that things a beast and the floor is 1/2" plate.

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#3

You know, I really have no idea.

@Chris_Wischkowsky any idea what the actual bottom of that oven is?

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#4

It’s probably insulation with maybe a layer of something on top and some structure below. I don’t know for sure, but I would not trust it.

Just make sure if you put something heavy in that you have the load evenly distributed across the floor, don’t put something heavy with sharp points. Perhaps even put in a sheet of metal at the bottom?

Alternatively you should be able to support your part with the steel structures on the left and right, that is the structure that is designed to take load. e.g. Put two bars across one of the tray angles to form a bridge. This will help with air flow on your part as well.

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#5

I’d suggest we put a piece of 1/4” plate on the bottom and never worry about it again.

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#6

The guy with solutions

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#7

Adding metal would make it take longer to heat up and it would heat unevenly. Just saying.

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#8

Always in favor of stuff like that.

could also make a jig and a steel shelf (not our powder coating shelves though) and something to get it in and out.

On top of distributing the weight, how are you getting it in without it being dropped? The drop is a significant increase over the static weight.

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#9

I would have to make a ramp and use a dolly. After it heats up, you can’t pick it up. This is all theoretical at the moment. I just wanted to be check the loading before I even considered it. I still have to source some stoody 1102 or equivalent hardfacing wire.

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#10

My thoughts on the loading system was similar to a pallet/skid style by using the pallet jack. Essentially creating a skid to load in & out with an attachment to the pallet jack.

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#11

this is basically the design of the shelf jig we’ve been trying to find someone to finish for a while lol

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#12

Why not load/pick it up with the engine crane.

A bit of chain makes this trivial

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#13

Has this unit been fixed yet?

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#14

I believe so, I saw it in use the other day

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#15

I think Tim’s idea for a 1/4 plate is the best one, I don’t think it will really effect the heating time in this instance. I also agree with Jim that it’s also guaranteed at some point somebody will drop something and this prevents damage from that event.

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#16

Using an engine hoist is brilliant. I’m going to file that one.

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#17

What was the oven designed to do originally? I’m concerned about hanging it. What’s the area of the base? If the oven was designed as a walk in then the load of a person (about 200 lb/sqft) should be ok.

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